Mitti ka lep May actually help in wound healing

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clay
Face pack

However the type of mud/clay used could change the effectiveness

That traditional mitti ka lep (layer of clay) for wound treatment, now has scientific sanction. New research has found that using wet mud or clay for skin wounds may help fight disease-causing bacteria.

However they also caution that not all types of clay are beneficial. Some may actually help bacteria grew

Wound
Applying clay on Wound

Researchers from Arizona State University in the US found that at least one type of clay has antibacterial effects against bacteria such as Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus, including resistant strains such as CRE and MRSA. These are common bacteria causing infections in wounds. The clay suspension was effective against a number of bacteria both in their planktonic and biofilm states. Biofilms are bacterial strategy to protect themselves. Wounds that have been infected by bacteria develop a film film or protective coating making them relatively resistant to antibiotics. They appear in two-thirds of the infections seen by physicians.

“We showed that this reduced iron-bearing clay can kill some strains of bacteria under the laboratory conditions used, including bacteria grown as biofilms, which can be particularly challenging to treat,” said Robin Patel, a clinical microbiologist at Mayo Clinic in the US.

The research, published in the International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, is preliminary and the scientists caution that only one concentration of the clay suspension was tested. The lab tests are a first step in simulating the complex environment found in an actual infected wound. However they also caution that not all types of clay are beneficial. Some may actually help bacteria grow. More research is needed to identify and reproduce the properties of clays that are antibacterial, researchers said.

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